Untitled
georgianadesign:

Designer Thom Filicia, NY.

georgianadesign:

Designer Thom Filicia, NY.

cvilletochucktown:

Curtis & Windham ftw 

cvilletochucktown:

Curtis & Windham ftw 

designcube:

Pegasus Home Desk by Tilla Goldberg

  1. push yourself to get up before the rest of the world - start with 7am, then 6am, then 5:30am. go to the nearest hill with a big coat and a scarf and watch the sun rise.

    2. push yourself to fall asleep earlier - start with 11pm, then 10pm, then 9pm. wake up in the morning feeling re-energized and comfortable.

    3. erase processed food from your diet. start with no lollies, chips, biscuits, then erase pasta, rice, cereal, then bread. use the rule that if a child couldn’t identify what was in it, you don’t eat it.

    4. get into the habit of cooking yourself a beautiful breakfast. fry tomatoes and mushrooms in real butter and garlic, fry an egg, slice up a fresh avocado and squirt way too much lemon on it. sit and eat it and do nothing else.

    5. stretch. start by reaching for the sky as hard as you can, then trying to touch your toes. roll your head. stretch your fingers. stretch everything.

    6. buy a 1L water bottle. start with pushing yourself to drink the whole thing in a day, then try drinking it twice.

    7. buy a beautiful diary and a beautiful black pen. write down everything you do, including dinner dates, appointments, assignments, coffees, what you need to do that day. no detail is too small.

    8. strip your bed of your sheets and empty your underwear draw into the washing machine. put a massive scoop of scented fabric softener in there and wash. make your bed in full.

    9. organise your room. fold all your clothes (and bag what you don’t want), clean your mirror, your laptop, vacuum the floor. light a beautiful candle.

    10. have a luxurious shower with your favourite music playing. wash your hair, scrub your body, brush your teeth. lather your whole body in moisturiser, get familiar with the part between your toes, your inner thighs, the back of your neck.

    11. push yourself to go for a walk. take your headphones, go to the beach and walk. smile at strangers walking the other way and be surprised how many smile back. bring your dog and observe the dog’s behaviour. realise you can learn from your dog.

    12. message old friends with personal jokes. reminisce. suggest a catch up soon, even if you don’t follow through. push yourself to follow through.

    14. think long and hard about what interests you. crime? sex? boarding school? long-forgotten romance etiquette? find a book about it and read it. there is a book about literally everything.

    15. become the person you would ideally fall in love with. let cars merge into your lane when driving. pay double for parking tickets and leave a second one in the machine. stick your tongue out at babies. compliment people on their cute clothes. challenge yourself to not ridicule anyone for a whole day. then two. then a week. walk with a straight posture. look people in the eye. ask people about their story. talk to acquaintances so they become friends.

    16. lie in the sunshine. daydream about the life you would lead if failure wasn’t a thing. open your eyes. take small steps to make it happen for you.

Sixteen Small Steps to Happiness  (via cardioconfidence)

Is it sad that just reading about doing half of these things makes me want to stick a fork in my eye opposed to actually do them?

(via paris2london)
mrmoderngentleman:

thearmoury:

:-O


All these OG Armoury posts are great

mrmoderngentleman:

thearmoury:

:-O

All these OG Armoury posts are great

dashingdivalicious:

I so want to live here .

dashingdivalicious:

I so want to live here .

themanliness:

25th St Residence | Source | MVMT | Facebook

themanliness:

25th St Residence | Source | MVMT | Facebook
themanliness:

Central Park Penthouse | Source | MVMT | Facebook

themanliness:

Central Park Penthouse | Source | MVMT | Facebook
sartorial-journal:

Liverano style:
1. Soft sloped shoulder that is slightly extended
2. Generous collar and lapel, classically proportioned with a low notch
3. Clean sleeve head
4. Breast pocket sits lower on the chest to compliment the collar and lapel
5. A light hand stitched canvas is used at the chest, an even softer gauge is used for the rest of the jacket
6. 3 button rolled to 2 configuration
7. Rich chest for a masculine shape
8. The jacket meets only at the central button due to the distinctive cut away style
9. Open quarters or cut away jacket opening. Typical Florentina style
10. Jackets can be side vented or un-vented
11. Pockets can be patch, jetted or flapped
12. Curved sleeve

sartorial-journal:

Liverano style:

1. Soft sloped shoulder that is slightly extended

2. Generous collar and lapel, classically proportioned with a low notch

3. Clean sleeve head

4. Breast pocket sits lower on the chest to compliment the collar and lapel

5. A light hand stitched canvas is used at the chest, an even softer gauge is used for the rest of the jacket

6. 3 button rolled to 2 configuration

7. Rich chest for a masculine shape

8. The jacket meets only at the central button due to the distinctive cut away style

9. Open quarters or cut away jacket opening. Typical Florentina style

10. Jackets can be side vented or un-vented

11. Pockets can be patch, jetted or flapped

12. Curved sleeve

howtotalktogirlsatparties:

Raf Simons S/S 97.
georgianadesign:

Greenwich residence, CT. S. B. Long Interiors.

georgianadesign:

Greenwich residence, CT. S. B. Long Interiors.

cinephiliabeyond:

Written and directed by Claudio Masenza, who had previously documented the lives of Marlon Brando and James Dean, and featuring an impressive interview cast, this was an incredible find. As Masenza retraces Montgomery Clift’s life, from his toddler years, through to his Hollywood years beginning with The Search  (1947) and ending with The Defector  (1966), we get some very rare insights into the life of this enigmatic actor with previously unseen home footage shot by family, friends and Clift himself. What we also learn about him is that he was something of a daredevil, a kind soul and a sensitive man, one who couldn’t bear the thought of others suffering. We also hear from his friends how his personality would change at the blink of an eye, either when he drank or when the mood would hit him. Hollywood Rebels: Montgomery Clift  (1983) dwells heavily on this side of him, as most biographies on Clift do. It’s a great documentary for anyone who is a fan of this remarkable and talented actor. The films of Montgomery Clift

At his best, Montgomery Clift was a better actor than Marlon Brando. For such a small, slightly-built man Clift had an intensity and depth to his performance that could eclipse Brando—even with all that actor’s realistic improvisations, impressive physicality and “naturalistic body language.”

Clift and Brando, along with James Dean, were the three “Method” actors who revolutionized an actor’s approach to performance. Their technique was about motivation and internal workings, which they used to make acting seem “real.” Clift was the first to bring this style of naturalism to the screen, appearing opposite John Wayne in Red River in 1946. His approach to acting irritated “The Duke,” who was of the “get up say your lines” school of performance, but the acrimony between the two added to the film. But it was his next film, The Search (1947), which alerted Hollywood to a new style of acting, leading one critic to ask the film’s director, Fred Zinnemann “Where did you find a soldier who can act so well?”

While Clift brought a subtly and depth to his work, it was Brando, with his over-wrought performance in Streetcar Named Desire (1951) that won all the attention. The problem for Clift was that he despised Hollywood, and the kind of stupidity the film industry perpetuated. It led to him making several bad choices in movies (rejecting On the Waterfront and East of Eden, pulling out of Sunset Boulevard) that later caused him to be labeled “difficult” and “unreliable.” He was also gay and refused to have his private life manipulated for the benefit of Hollywood publicists, in the way Rock Hudson would acquiesce.

The turning point in Clift’s career was a near fatal car crash that occurred during the filming of the blockbuster historical romance Raintree County with Elizabeth Taylor, in 1956. Clift had been driving home from an evening at Taylor’s place when he lost control of his vehicle. The crash was witnessed by his friend (Invasion of the Body Snatchers star) Kevin McCarthy, who was in a car ahead of Clift. Taylor arrived at the scene, where she removed two broken front teeth embedded in Clift’s tongue, it prevented the actor from choking. The crash left Clift disfigured with a broken jaw and nose, and in constant pain for the rest of his life. It also delayed production on the movie, but made it a box office smash, as fans came to see Clift’s face before-and-after the accident.

If Clift had died in the crash, he would have been lionized like James Dean, probably more so, as Clift had a greater and far more impressive resume of film work, including A Place in the Sun, Hitchcock’s I Confess, and From Here to Eternity. Unfortunately, the accident was the start of Clift’s slow and long descent, as he became addicted to pain killers and drugs in a bid to anesthetize the constant pain he suffered. It led one acting coach to unfairly label Clift’s post-crash career as “the longest suicide in Hollywood history.”

I worked on this documentary about Clift some twenty years ago, it was part of a series called Post Mortem made for Channel 4 television in the UK. The idea of the series was to look at an individual’s life through their medical history and how illness, disease and addiction affected or influenced their work. The others included in the series were Virginia Woolf (bipolar), Nijinsky (schizophrenia), Francis Bacon (asthma), Beethoven (deafness). With Clift, we examined his life through his various ailments, including childhood amoebic dysentery, chronic colitis, hypothyroidism (which caused him to age prematurely), alcoholism, drug addiction, and the tragic effects relating to his car crash. The documentary includes rarely seen home movie footage of Clift taken by his actor friend Kevin McCarthy and interviews with McCarthy, Kenneth Anger, and Clift biographers Patricia Bosworth and Barney Hoskyns. Montgomery Clift: Better than Brando, more tragic than James Dean by Paul Gallagher

Below: John Huston directs Montgomery Clift on The Misfits  (1961), which was both Marilyn Monroe’s and Clark Gable’s last film. Monroe, who was also having emotional and substance abuse problems at the time, famously described Clift in a 1961 interview as “the only person I know who is in even worse shape than I am.” Photo courtesy of Taschen’s Los Angeles, Portrait of a City.

Here’s a rarity: Arthur Miller’s screenplay for The Misfits  [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only). As always, thanks to the great folks at Write to Reel. The DVD/Blu-ray of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

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